When the waste oil went into the fire: A story of resilience

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Washed up on a sofa in a room filled with rubbish, two members of the local community took on the daunting task of cleaning up a blaze in the middle of a busy residential street.

On the morning of the fire, they were joined by members of a nearby community, who had already taken on the task of clearing up rubbish that had started to burn.

The fire started at a nearby property, where the residents were storing waste from the nearby community’s waste-burning business.

It spread to a neighbouring residential area and then spread to an adjacent residential block, where residents were using the waste to fuel their home.

The residents then set fire to the house of a local resident.

In the middle and final stages of the blaze, the house’s front and rear doors had been broken open and the residents who had been inside had been killed.

By the time firefighters arrived, they had to cut the fire out.

The disaster left residents in shock and a huge loss of personal property.

In addition to the lost personal belongings, the cost to extinguish the fire was estimated at $250,000, including the cost of a team of eight firefighters.

A community gathering on Monday to remember the dead and to express grief and solidarity with the victims of the house fire in Sydney’s south-west.

The community gathered in the town of Gorton to mark the anniversary of the tragedy.

They were joined later by a member of the NSW Government, who said that the State Government had already put money into the community and provided help to those affected by the fire.

The NSW Government said it had set up a community support group to support the community’s efforts to deal with the loss of life.

“It is also encouraging that the NSW government has also pledged to provide $30,000 to assist the local authorities in their response to the fire,” NSW Premier Mike Baird said in a statement.

“The NSW government is committed to assisting in any way possible to help the community recover from this devastating fire.”

The fire has left a hole in the community, but it is not the first time that waste from waste-burners has been ignited in NSW.

In October, a resident of Goolwa, about 50 kilometres south of Sydney, set fire at a landfill after an incinerator used to burn waste had caught fire.

A local resident later described the scene of the explosion as “a bomb”.

The fire is not overThe NSW Department of Emergency Services said it is working with the local authority in Goolwah to identify who may have set fire, what equipment was used and what measures are being taken to ensure the community does not experience similar events.

Residents have been asked to keep their distance from the flames and to remain indoors, to prevent the fire spreading.

In response, a community gathering was held on Monday in the Goolwich town centre.

The event featured a memorial service for the residents of Goolswa, which was attended by local residents, community members and officials from the NSW Department for Emergency Services.

Residents were also encouraged to donate money to help cover the costs of the funeral and burial costs.

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